So I am back to blogging. I have missed it. I was here, following everyone else’s blogs on a daily basis but unable mentally and time-wise to do much with my own blogs. I am pursuing my second degree and schoolwork was taking up all my spare time. We are short-handed at work so work-work was already taking up most of my waking hours. I was coming home each evening from work with an almost empty (mental) fuel tank and had to devote what extra I had left to schooling.

I am glad to say that my Macroeconomics course is a thing of the past, and I “passed” it with flying colors – 94.5%. Boy, oh boy, did I ever hate that class. I understand the value of knowing the buzz words – inflation, deflation, recession, depression, etc., but NO ONE will ever need to know (in real life) which way the aggregate demand or aggregate supply curve shifts if something happens in the economy. There were way too many charts and grafts and useless information in this class. I have never ever experienced a textbook that I could not understand no matter how many times I read it. I finally gave up in the second or third week and stopped reading it altogether. You can tell by my final grade that it was superfluous. I love (and cherish) books and would never intentionally mistreat one. This class had me (childishly) tossing the book across the room, intentionally crumpling or tearing the pages in frustration, and yes, even jumping up and down on it several times. I vowed when the class ended that I was going to burn it. I haven’t (yet).

I understand liberal arts courses offered by colleges are meant to make the younger students better and more well-rounded thinkers. They are meant to help them build upon their thought-processes. I think that older students will already have picked up most of those cognitive reasoning skills in the school of “life”. After a certain age, liberal arts classes like macroeconomics, psychology, sociology or ecology should not be mandatory. I also believe that unless one desires to be a mathematician some of the higher end math courses should also be eliminated. I’ve been around 55 years (37 of those years out of High School). Not once has anyone on the street, at home or at work ever asked me to find the value of “x”.

So I am on a break from school and back to being able to breathe a bit again. School does not start up again until mid-January. I had 4-1/2 days off of work for Christmas break, and I admit that was also an adjustment. I have been running in highest gear for so long that I found it almost impossible to relax at first. The day after Christmas I was anxious and eager to log into my work email to find out what was going on, but I forced myself to let it lie. I have another 4-1/2 days off for New Year’s week, and I am hoping to use that time to mentally get myself into the weight loss mode again. Yes, that is an area that I need to concentrate upon.

I hope that everyone had wonderful Christmas (or Hanukkah) holidays. I wish everyone a wonderful and Happy New Year. Here’s hoping that 2015 brings nothing but good things to everyone.

OKImage courtesy of Pinterest

2 thoughts on “Winter Break

  1. Welcome back! I completely agree with you about the wisdom of some of the required classes students are forced to take to get their degrees. Congratulations on getting through macroeconomics and getting a great grade!

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    1. dflorack says:

      Thank you, Sherrie. It’s good to be back for a bit. I’m sure I’ll get sucked away again. I’m done with all the silly liberal arts classes. From here on in, it will be all law- and paralegal-related courses (the meat of the program). Not any easier but at least necessary and worthwhile.

      Liked by 1 person

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